Raw Vegan Baby Banana Pancakes

banana pancakes

This recipe is heavily inspired by the addictively amazing raw pancakes at Erewhon Market in Los Angeles. I wasn’t trying to replicate it per se, but I wouldn’t have made them had I not fallen in love with the ones at Erewhon.

This pancake recipe has a base of bananas, and I have not tried making it any other way, so it’s not keto. But, it is free of added sugars & totally paleo – the sweetness comes from the baby bananas.

You could use regular bananas in this recipe and it would taste pretty much the same, but “Baby Banana Pancakes” sounded so cute!

You could also add blueberries, chocolate chips, cocoa powder, chai spices or nuts to this recipe and make whatever kind of pancakes you want!

I just added a dash of cinnamon and vanilla, which play off the sweet banana flavor wonderfully.

If I have any warnings about this recipe, it would be to not eat six in one go like I did. When it comes to raw food, especially blended and dehydrated nuts, seeds and fruits, it can be easy to chow down on a whole lot without realizing how much food you’re actually consuming.

For example, one dehydrated baby banana is going to seem much smaller than a fresh baby banana, but it’s still the same amount of sugar and fiber.

You know what I mean?

Anyway, these pancakes are tender, soft, sweet and have just the right amount of bite to them. They’re also super easy to make; you just need a blender and the dehydrator does the rest of the work for you.

This is an “overnight” recipe, so definitely start these earlier in the evening so you can wake up to fresh, warm banana pancakes for breakfast!

If you’re in a hurry or just want these for dinner (no judgement here, I’m no stranger to the “breakfast for dinner” movement) you can also increase the temperature on your dehydrator to 115° F and dehydrate them for three hours, flip, then dehydrate for four more hours.

I just topped them with a little organic buttery coconut oil and raw honey, but if I had some grade-A maple syrup around I would’ve opted for that.

Fresh chia blueberry jam would be divine as well, or cashew cream and strawberries.

This makes anywhere from 7 – 14 servings, depending on how big you want your pancakes to be. Just keep in mind larger pancakes will take longer to dehydrate. I used 1/4 cup scoop per pancake, and ended up with 12 of these bad boys.

Let’s get into the recipe!

Ingredients:

4 cups fresh banana chunks, or about 2 bunches of baby bananas
1/2 cup almond flour 
1/2 cup golden flax meal
1 cup raw pecans
2 cups raw almond milk  
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp sea salt 
1 tsp vanilla extract

Directions:

  1. Add all the ingredients to a high speed blender such as a Vitamix, with the bananas going in first.
  2. Blend on high speed, using the tamper to push the ingredients into the blade. This may require a bit of arm work, but it should go by pretty quick. If your blender is having a hard time, add 1/4 cup of almond milk or water at a time until a super smooth, yet relatively thick batter is achieved.
  3. Scoop out into little pancakes on a dehydrator sheet and dehydrate at 115° F for three hours, then flip them over and dehydrate at 110° F for 8-10 hours. These are pretty forgiving, so don’t sweat it if you leave them in an hour or two longer than this – especially at such a low temperature.
  4. Pop a few on a plate and smother them in vegan butter, berry sauce, maple syrup or whatever else strikes your fancy.

Enjoy! ❤

Good Morning Matcha Latte

Ahh, matcha.

Some mornings, it’s literally a life saver.

Whenever I start my day with a warm, comforting matcha latte, I can just feel the Green Tea gods shining down upon me:

“You’re going to have a good day today, Mackenna, we’ll make sure of it.”

Thank you, matcha.

If you’re a fan of matcha, you know what I’m talking about.

It has gentle, slow-releasing energy that doesn’t end with the same crash as coffee.

Though I love the taste of coffee, it’s always made me anxious and jittery, so I don’t drink it.

If you drink matcha all day like I do, you might also be a matcha snob.

I always try to use organic, grade-A matcha for my lattes, not only because it tastes better, but because it’s often tested for heavy metals and pesticide residues.

Matcha green tea is an antioxidant bomb, and may actually contain cancer fighting compounds.

Matcha originated in Japan, and has been consumed for centuries as a frothy tea.

It’s made from grinding green tea into a fine powder.

Matcha tea is very high in an antioxidant called theanine, which is also believed to attribute to the rich, deep flavor matcha tea has.

You can use any type of milk you like for this recipe, but I usually like to use almond milk.

One cool thing about matcha is that it’s so versatile!

You can add tonic herbs, different flavors like rose, cinnamon or vanilla, or add it to milkshakes, ice cream and desserts.

This recipe is perfect for mornings, especially when a busy day awaits.

I included ashitaba in this recipe, which is an amazing herb – especially for vegans – due to its blood building and nourishing properties.

It also aids in regulating metabolism, supports the immune system and promotes proper digestive function.

It also has a grassy, mild flavor that pairs nicely with matcha.

Ingredients:

12 oz raw almond milk
1 tsp matcha tea powder
1/2 tsp ashitaba powder
1 tsp maple syrup (optional)

Directions:

  1. In a small saucepan, heat the almond milk on low heat until just steaming.
  2. Add to a blender with the matcha, ashitaba and maple syrup.
  3. Blend until super smooth. (Alternatively, if you have a high speed blender, you can heat the latte in the blender by blending it on high until warm – about 2-3 minutes. This keeps the recipe raw as well.)
  4. Pour into your favorite mug.

Enjoy! ❤



Raw Almond Mylk

I’m a huge almond milk fan.

When it comes to non-dairy milks, my body is happiest when I drink almond milk.

Almonds are an amazing beauty food, and are abundant in antioxidants including skin-loving Vitamin E.

They’re high in the anti-stress mineral magnesium, as well as bone-building manganese.

Almond milk is my favorite choice for making my morning matcha latte, especially considering almonds sit so well in my stomach.

When I became plant-based, I was shocked at all the strange ingredients store-bought almond milks had.

Gums, stabilizers, oils, fillers and….

So. Much. Added. Sugar!!

Plus, the ones that were organic, had the cleanest ingredients and tasted the best were often up to $11 a bottle.

I don’t have a problem with spending extra money for higher quality, healthier products, but when the ingredients are just almonds and water I would rather make my own.

Plus, home-made is so much better!

The only investment you need to make is a good quality nut milk bag.

I say good quality because some nut milk bags, particularly the super cheap ones, are not fine enough to filter out all the nut pulp from the milk.

I’ve ended up with way too many gritty almond milks because of a crummy nut milk bag.

When you buy one, hold it up to the light. It should be very finely woven, and you should not be able to see through it.

I’m talking almost like trying to look through a piece of fabric.

Even if you don’t have the best blender in the world, a good nut milk bag will give you smooth and creamy almond milk.

Save the almond pulp!

You can use it in baking, skincare, raw recipes, oatmeal and more.

It’s great stuff, and it freezes wonderfully.

As far as soaking goes, if you have a standard blender I would highly recommend soaking your almonds for 8-12 hours before making the milk.

If you have a Vitamix or similar, you don’t have to soak them, but it helps soften the almonds, increases bioavailability and makes them easier to digest.

This recipe is best within the first 3 days of making it.

Ingredients:

2 cups raw almonds
5 to 6 cups filtered or spring water (use less water for a thicker milk)
1/2 tsp sea salt
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp maple syrup or honey (optional)

Directions:

  1. Blend everything together in a blender on high speed for about 60 seconds.
  2. Pour the milk through your nut milk bag into a large bowl.
  3. Squeeze until all the milk has left the almond pulp inside the bag, and the pulp is dry.
  4. Pour into an airtight container and store in the fridge.
  5. You can store the almond pulp in a ziplock bag in the freezer for later use if you wish.

Enjoy! ❤

Creamy No-Fried Beans

From the time I was five to the moment I decided to be a vegetarian at age twelve I was addicted to Taco Bell.

My mom and I (also an ex-Taco Bell junky) would often stop there for dinner after she picked me up from staying with my dad in Sacramento.

While I wasn’t picky about which gooey, cheese-smothered, red sauce-drenched delicacy I was going to chow down on, I did have a few favorites:

Their Seasoned Red Rice, nacho cheese dip, the legendary “Enchirito”, and the joy de vivre of Taco Bell:

Their re-fried beans.

Anything that was on the menu that contained those beans, I was all in.

As I became more health-conscious, my love for re-fried beans evolved.

I was soon a huge fan of Amy’s organic re-fried beans.

I digress.

To this day I still love re-fried beans, but I would much rather have a just-as-satisfying raw vegan version.

I think there’s a misnomer that raw food can’t be heavy, comforting or full of hearty flavors and robust spices.

One of my main goals in starting this blog was to show the world that raw vegan junk food is real.

And I eat it.

A lot.

These no-fried beans are extremely satisfying, filling and versatile.

You can put them in raw tacos or burritos, pair them with raw Mexican “rice”, use them as a dip for chips or veggies, or eat them like I do:

Topped with fresh avocado and chunky salsa fresca.

Plus, they have a hearty amount of secret raw veggies, making this a great recipe to feed picky kids.

The best part?

They only take about 10 minutes to make!

This recipe makes about 4 servings, and can be stored in the fridge for about 3 days.

Ingredients:

2 cups raw sunflower seeds
1 cup yellow or green zucchini
4 to 5 sun-dried tomatoes, re-hydrated in warm water or packed in olive oil
1/4 cup chopped red or yellow bell pepper
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1 heaping tbsp chickpea miso paste 
1 tbsp nutritional yeast
1/2 tsp tamari 
1/4 tsp onion powder
1 clove garlic
1/4 tsp smoked paprika 
1/4 smoked sea salt (optional) sub with regular sea salt if unavailable
1/4 tsp ancho chile powder
1-2 tbsp filtered or spring water to blend

Directions:

  1. Add sunflower seeds to a food processor and grind until a gritty paste is achieved.
  2. Add zucchini, sun-dried tomatoes, bell pepper and miso paste and continue to process into a paste, scraping down the sides.
  3. Add in all the remaining ingredients and continue to process into a creamy “re-fried beans” consistency, adding water a tablespoon at a time if needed.
  4. Taste with a spoon and adjust seasonings if you’d like.
  5. Dish up and top with avocado, salsa fresca and chopped cilantro!

Enjoy! ❤


Sugar-Free Mango Cardamom Chia Pudding

Chia puddings have always been my favorite go-to breakfast (or dessert) recipe.

I remember when I was about seven, I thought chia seed gel tasted (and looked) just like what I imagined frog eggs to taste like… but I still ate them.

Kids are weird.

Chia puddings are so easy to make and taste amazing – plus they’re loaded with nutritional benefits.

Chia seeds are one of my favorite “superfoods” of all time!

They’re chock-full of omega-3 fatty acids, functional protein, soothing fiber and antioxidants.

In fact, chia seeds are one of the foods that I credit to helping my gut health improve in leaps and bounds.

Because of their high fiber content, they help to keep you full for a longer time without weighing you down, and are the perfect pre or post-workout snack.

Since chia seeds don’t have much taste to them, it’s easy to get creative with flavors for your puddings.

I’m a huge fan of cardamom, so I wanted to make a spin-off on a mango lassi – in pudding form!

Chia puddings tend to be similar in texture to tapioca pudding, but if you want a smoother texture you can actually blend the chia seeds into the mango cashew cream as well.

They’ll still “bloom” and form a sort of gel, so just let it sit in the fridge as normal before enjoying.

Another thing to note about this recipe is the type of mango you’re using.

Since we’ll be blending the mangoes, it doesn’t much matter if it’s a “good mango” – as long as it’s ripe, it’s totally fine.

There are two main types of mango available in most areas of the United States:

The Tommy Atkins Mango (or very similar)

And the Ataulfo Mango (or very similar)

Both will work wonderfully in this recipe, but keep in mind that the Ataulfo and similar mangoes are much smaller than the Tommy mango.

If you’re opting for Ataulfo, I would use two.

Let’s jump in!

Ingredients:

2 small Ataulfo mangoes OR 1 large Tommy Atkins mango (or similar)
1/2 cup raw cashews, soaked in filtered water overnight
1/2 cup chia seeds 
2 cups filtered or spring water
2 tsp vanilla extract 
1/8 tsp monk fruit OR 1 tbsp maple syrup OR 4 pitted medjool dates
1/4 tsp cardamom 
1 tbsp coconut MCT oil (optional)
1/4 tsp sea salt 

Directions:

  1. Blend cashews with water, sea salt, vanilla, cardamom and sweetener.
  2. Cut mangos into small chunks and add to the cashew cream.
  3. Blend until smooth.
  4. Pour into a large bowl, and add chia seeds.
  5. Mix until well-combined.
  6. Cover chia pudding and put it into the fridge for about 6-8 hours, stirring once or twice to make sure the seeds don’t gel at the bottom.

Enjoy! ❤

Chia Later (-;

Creamy Cashew Mylk

As far as flavor, creaminess and versatility, cashew milk is probably my favorite non-dairy milk alternative.

While cashews are a little heavier and more difficult for your digestive system to process, I notice that when I blend them into milks or sauces, I have a much easier time with them.

Cashews are actually not nuts, but a seed harvested from a variety of fruit called a “Cashew Apple”, which is native to Brazil.

While we will be using “raw” cashews for this recipe, take note that all cashews sold in stores have been steamed to remove harmful compounds found in truly raw cashews.

Cashews aren’t my top choice of nut in terms of overall digestibility, but they actually contain a ton of nutrients, healthy fats and protein.

They’re extremely high in copper, which plays a vital role in maintaining healthy blood and bones.

They also have high amounts of magnesium, the “anti-stress” mineral; vitamin E, a skin-loving antioxidant; manganese, a metabolism booster; and oleic acid, a healthy omega fatty acid.

So to sum it up, cashews are kind of a major superfood – just stick to the ones sold at the grocery store.

Because this milk recipe is rich with glorious, creamy cashew nuts, it’s perfect for making lattes, adding to coffee or tea, making chia puddings, baking, and adding creaminess to smoothies and “mylkshakes”.

If you have a friend, co-worker or family member who thinks they don’t like non-dairy milks, give them this one.

Probably my favorite thing about this milk recipe is you don’t actually need to use a nut milk bag.

The raw cashews break down to a smooth consistency in any high-speed blender. This also helps make it a heartier, more filling and protein-rich nut milk option.

Which for me, is a godsend, as I tend to be lazy when it comes to making nut milks. But there is such a difference between homemade and store bought nut milks, it’s so worth it in the end.

You also don’t have to soak your cashews, but it will help with consistency – especially if you don’t have a Vitamix or other high-powered blender.

This recipe will make you about 6 cups of cashew milk, which turns out to be quite a lot. I like to share mine with friends and family, because it’s such a crowd-pleaser!

With refrigeration it should last up to about 4 days in the fridge.

Ingredients:

2 cups raw cashews
6 cups filtered or spring water
1/4 tsp vanilla extract
2 pitted medjool dates (optional)
1/8 tsp sea salt 

Directions:

  1. If you’re soaking your cashews, let them soak in three cups of filtered water, in an airtight container (in the fridge) for 6-8 hours, or overnight.
  2. Drain and rinse the cashews before adding to the blender.
  3. Add everything to a high speed blender.
  4. Blend on high for about 3 minutes, or until the outside of the blender becomes a tiny bit warm.
  5. Pour into a mason jar or reusable container.

Enjoy! ❤

Raw Vegan Sugar-Free Cinnamon Apple Crepes with Probiotic Pecan Cream

This raw vegan dish totally highlights the amazing honeycrisp apples I found at the health food store 

It’s sweet, creamy, cinnamon-y, and the crepes are soooo tender and soft (and the best part is, I used pre-made coconut wraps to make them!)

If you’re a fan of anything sweet and breakfast-y, you’ll love these.

These crepes make the perfect dessert, as well. Especially for anyone with sugar-sensitivities! 

I myself have a very low tolerance for fructose, meaning I can’t really eat very many fruits or I’ll bloat up like nobody’s business.

If you don’t already know this, I have been dealing with Candida overgrowth in my digestive tract off and on, so fruit doesn’t sit with me so well.

The few fruits I tolerate are most types of berries, certain types of melon and apples.

Luckily, I love all those things.

While I don’t consume any fruit besides berries often, once in a while I love adding apples to raw recipes because of their amazing fiber content!

Apples actually contain a soluble fiber called “pectin”. 

Pectin helps your body detoxify, and scrubs the colon clean of old waste material.

Apples also contain loads of minerals and nutrients. They contain a surprising amount of vitamin C, and a high amount of potassium. 

Apples are made up of mostly water (like most fruits), making them very hydrating and cleansing.

This recipe is also topped with a probiotic pecan & cashew cream.

I try to add probiotics to almost every dessert recipe I make. 

Apples are also an amazing prebiotic food, meaning the good bacteria in your gut love to feed off of them.

So by adding probiotics to this recipe, you’re not only adding more friendly bacteria to your digestive tract, but also giving them a meal to keep them happy.

The probiotics are, of course, totally optional, and you’re welcome to sub the apples for any other fruit you like.

(I’m thinking a blackberry or strawberry crepe would be to die for.)

Anyway, let’s get on to the recipe.

*makes about 5 servings*

Ingredients:

Crepes:

1 package Cinnamon Coconut Wraps (Plain will work just fine if you can’t find cinnamon)

Cinnamon Apple Filling:

4 honeycrisp apples
1 tsp lemon juice
1/4 tsp vanilla bean
1/8 tsp organic monk fruit 
1 pinch sea salt 
1 tbsp coconut MCT oil or coconut oil

Probiotic Pecan Cream:

1 cup coconut water
1/4 cup raw pecans
2 cups raw cashews 
1/8 tsp vanilla bean 
1/8 tsp monk fruit 
Contents of 2 probiotic capsules
1 pinch sea salt 

Directions:

  1. Finely dice the apples and mix well with the rest of the filling ingredients.
  2. Spread evenly onto a dehydrator sheet and dehydrate at 115° for 45 minutes, or until soft.
  3. In the meantime, blend pecan cream ingredients in a high speed blender until smooth.
  4. Line 4 coconut wraps on a dehydrator sheet, and spread 1 tbsp pecan cream evenly onto the surface of each wrap. 
  5. Place wraps in the dehydrator and dehydrate at 110° for about 5-7 minutes, or until warm, soft and pliable. 
  6. Remove cinnamon apples from the dehydrator, and mix in 3-4 tbsp of the pecan cream. 
  7. Scoop 1/4 cup cinnamon apple mixture onto a wrap, and roll it up tight, like a crepe!
  8. You can dehydrate these again for a few minutes to re-warm them.
  9. Top with a dollop of pecan cream and sprinkle with chopped pecan nuts and cinnamon!

Enjoy ❤